How Does Bankruptcy Affect Co-Signers?

Among the obstacles that stand in the way of filing bankruptcy in the minds of many debtors is the question of co-signers. Many people who would otherwise move toward filing bankruptcy hesitate out of concern for co-signers — or uncertainty.

In your case, the way you approach this issue may depend on who the co-signer is. If your parents, your brother or sister, friend or business partner cosigned on a loan, you most likely want to protect them (or him or her) from collection hazards. On the other hand, if your co-signer was an ex-girlfriend or ex-boyfriend, you may be less concerned about shielding that person.

In either case, it is helpful to know that:

In a Chapter 13 bankruptcy, the automatic stay that goes into effect upon filing protects co-signers from collection efforts. This means that during the three- to five-year repayment period, creditors are not allowed to pursue collection efforts — including going after co-signers without court approval.

At the end of the Chapter 13 repayment period, there remains the possibility that a creditor may go after a co-signer for whatever portion of a debt remains.

A Chapter 7 bankruptcy is over much more quickly. Therefore, the period of protection of co-signers is much shorter. In just a few months, creditors can once again pursue co-signers. This is one reason that many debtors with co-signer concerns choose Chapter 13 bankruptcy.

Keep in mind that generalizations on a website such as this may not address unique aspects of your financial status, including co-signer issues. A personalized consultation with a bankruptcy law attorney is the way to get answers that address your unique circumstances.

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Call 866-788-0394 or send an email to schedule a meeting with a Tennessee bankruptcy law attorney today. Bring your questions such as, "How does bankruptcy affect co-signers?"

The law office of Ben Sissman is a debt relief agency that helps people file for bankruptcy relief under the Bankruptcy Code.

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