Tennessee residents may consider bankruptcy for debt help

Tennessee residents may consider bankruptcy for debt help

| Aug 14, 2015 | Debt Management, Firm News

Knowing what steps to take in order to make a financial situation better may not always come easy for Tennessee residents. They may think that given enough time they will be able to handle their debt on their own or that they would rather continue accumulating debt and interest rather than filing for bankruptcy. However, bankruptcy may be a more beneficial option than many individuals realize.

If individuals have considerable debt, they may be at risk of having their wages garnished. Wage garnishment can negatively affect individuals who are possibly already on a limited income. Though this strategy may be used by debt collectors, filing for bankruptcy may be able to stop such garnishment. In certain situations, individuals may also be able get some of their garnished wages back. Of course, each situation depends on the particular circumstances of the individual.

It may not be wise to consider bankruptcy a catch-all for debt problems as some debt may not be discharged through the process, but moving forward in an attempt to handle debt could be considered a step in the right direction. There are qualifications that may need to be met in order to file, and having information on these qualifications may prove beneficial. Additionally, consulting with an attorney who is knowledgeable on the subject may also help a party better understand the ramifications.

Debt can often make individuals feel uncomfortable about their situations and may also lead to uncertainty when it comes to finances. This uncertainty may cause parties to put off dealing with their issues, but luckily, there is information available that could help. By exploring bankruptcy and its facets, concerned Tennessee residents may be better able to determine whether it is the right step for them.

Source: morningjournal.com, “Eli De Los Santos: Is bankruptcy right for me?“, Eli De Los Santos, Aug. 1, 2015